London,
03
February
2017
|
11:24
Europe/London

Minding the gap: Camden publishes its full pay analysis for 2016

Camden Council has published its pay analysis for 2016, which shows no significant differences in pay by gender, ethnicity, disability and full time/ part time working at the majority of job levels.

The total overall gender pay level gap is just 1% across the Council.

The statistics do reveal a pay gap in favour of males at three different job levels. Further analysis shows that this is mainly due to male employees at these levels having recorded almost double the length of service than female employees, meaning they have progressed further up the pay band. The pay gap significantly reduces when males and females with the same or similar length of service are compared.

The Council has also published its employment profile for 2016, which outlines statistics about our staff, including ethnicity, age, gender and disability status.

Both the pay analysis and our employment profile can now be read online.

Councillor Sarah Hayward, Leader of Camden Council
“We have been working hard to build equality into every aspect of our employment practices: taking the lead on gender pay reporting, becoming the first Timewise Council - which commits us to providing flexible working arrangements tailored to an individual employee’s circumstances - and paying all our staff at least the London Living Wage. 

“It’s through maintaining our diverse workforce that we’ll best represent Camden and its residents, a borough renowned for its mixed communities.”
Councillor Sarah Hayward, Leader of Camden Council

The Council welcomes an open scrutiny of its data and feedback from staff, trade unions, other employees and members of the public. The Council will update this data and publish every year as part of its commitment to data transparency.

Gender:

  • The total overall gender pay level gap is just 1%.
    • Pay Levels 1,3,4 & 6 are all under 5% variation (range from 3.9% to -4%)
    • Pay Level 2
      Zone 1 has a -8.2% pay gap in favour of males. Male employees at this level have almost double the length of service than females and are more likely to have reached the top of the pay range. If we measure the pay gap broken down by length of service effectively comparing males and females with the same or similar length the pay gap is significantly reduced. For males and females with less than one years’ service the pay gap is zero as all the employees are on the same salary (£23,244) which is the bottom of the grade. The pay gap is also at 0% when we compare males and females with more than 10 years’ service.
    • Pay Level 5
      Zone 2 has a -5.9% pay gap in favour of males. As with Level 2 Zone 1, male employees have a greater average length of service than their female counterparts.
    • Pay Level 7
      The Director level has a pay gap of -10.9% in favour of males. This group has a very small population of just 12 employees in total, with just 5 females.

Ethnicity:

  • Pay Level 2
    • Zone 1 has a -10.2% pay gap in favour of non BME employees. As per the gender variation, this difference has been impacted by length of service with the average length of service for non BME staff at 14 compared to 6.4 for BME staff. Of the 42 employees earning the minimum salary 78.6% (33) had been employed within the organisation for less than one year as of 31 March 2016; 24 of which were from a BME background. 75% of females at this grade are BME compared to only 41% of males.

Disability:

  • There are no notable negative variations in relation to disability, when work of equal value is examined.

Full time/ part time working

  • Pay Level 5 Zone 2 has a 5.3% pay gap in favour of full time workers. This mirrors the gender pay gap at this level. With more females working part time and males working full time with longer length of service.
Contact
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